Monthly Archive for September, 2009

Communities and Organizational Change Management Presentation

In August, I wrote a post about how Organizational Change Management principles could be used to help increase participation in online communities. Bill Johnson asked me to elaborate on that post with a presentation in the Online Community Research Network Roundtable call, and I wanted to share my slides from that discussion here.

Fall Sale: Companies and Communities Book Discount

In celebration of the beginning of fall, I wanted to offer you a discount on my book, Companies and Communities: Participating without being sleazy.

For the next week, you can get the paperback version of the book for $12.99, which is $3.00 off the regular price of $15.99 by using the discount code QYW8QS6W and purchasing it directly from the publisher. This deal will end on October 6, 2009.

As always, you can still get the PDF version of the book for only $9.99 if you prefer to have a searchable copy that you can carry around on your computer.

Companies and Communities: Participating without being sleazy is focused on helping your company get real business value out of participating in online communities and social media. This 85 page eBook or 130 page book contains practical advice and suggestions for how companies can engage with online communities and social media sites. You can download an excerpt of the book or learn more about it before you decide to buy a copy.

Blogging Elsewhere

Here is this week’s summary of links to my posts appearing on other blogs:

GigaOM’s WebWorkerDaily*

Olliance Blog*

Intel Software Network*

If you want a feed of all of my blog posts across multiple sites, you can also subscribe to my über feed.

*Disclaimers:

  • GigaOM’s WebWorkerDaily: I am a paid blogger for the GigaOM network.
  • Olliance Blog: I am the Senior Executive & Online Community Practice Manager at Olliance
  • Intel Software Network: I provide consulting services to Intel, and these blog posts are one part of my consulting engagement.

Recent Links

Here are a few interesting things from this week that I wanted to share …

Online Communities: Metrics and Reporting 2009

Don’t lose existing members of your online community

The importance of signals, symbols, and rules in successful communities

Social Support: Are Companies Teaching Customers To Yell At Their Friends?

Social Media Measurement Lags Adoption

Social media and customer service – some examples

Confirmed: Twitter is Saving All Your Tweets, After All

Google’s SideWiki Shifts Power To Consumers –Away From Corporate Websites

Social media and random acts of kindness

The Top Six Reasons Companies are Still Scared of Social Media

You can find all of my links on Delicious.

LinuxCon Review: It's All About Community

I had a great time at LinuxCon this week, and I loved that it was held here in Portland, OR. My favorite part of the event was running into old friends and ex-coworkers from my days at Intel who I haven’t seen in ages. It was great catching up with everyone, and I even managed to introduce a few of them to Whiffies and some of my other favorite food carts for quick lunches or late night snacks.

LinuxCon

I did a much longer review of the event over on the Olliance Blog, but I wanted to highlight a few things here on Fast Wonder, too.

Community.

I love the sense of community that you get at conferences where most of the audience members are open source developers. People with laptops were clustered together in little groups having conversations, working on code, and eating Voodoo donuts (how many conferences have strangely colored donuts covered with things like bacon and breakfast cereal?)

My favorite community-related session was a keynote by Bdale Garbee on The Freedom to Collaborate. Much of what he said is common knowledge for those us in the open source world, but it got me thinking more about how companies and communities interact. I won’t duplicate everything here, but I wrote several paragraphs with my thoughts on this session on the Olliance Blog.

Linus Torvalds. The Linux Kernel Roundtable was one of the most popular sessions with a room full of geeks listening to Linus and other kernel developers talk about various Linux kernel topics.

Moblin. This was a hot topic at the event, and I’m not just saying this because Intel is a client. People were talking about Moblin in hallways and presenters kept mentioning them in sessions. This was a Linux Foundation event, and Moblin was turned over to the Linux Foundation by Intel in early April, so that could explain at least some of the buzz.

Fun. We had the Fake Linus Torvalds contest where Matt Asay came out ahead of Dan Lyons (the famous FakeSteveJobs guy). We even had an appearance from Steve Ballmer, or maybe it was Jeremy Allison as Steve Ballmer at the Golden Penguin Bowl, which was filled with funny geek trivia and a live helicopter battle.

If you want to know more about LinuxCon, you can read my longer review of the event.

Blogging Elsewhere

Here is this week’s summary of links to my posts appearing on other blogs:

GigaOM’s WebWorkerDaily*

Olliance Blog*

Intel Software Network*

Portland Data Plumbers User Group (pdpug)

If you want a feed of all of my blog posts across multiple sites, you can also subscribe to my über feed.

*Disclaimers:

  • GigaOM’s WebWorkerDaily: I am a paid blogger for the GigaOM network.
  • Olliance Blog: I am the Senior Executive & Online Community Practice Manager at Olliance
  • Intel Software Network: I provide consulting services to Intel, and these blog posts are one part of my consulting engagement.

Recent Links

Here are a few interesting things from this week that I wanted to share …

How to build an online community

Jive Market Engagement promises to help companies monitor—and effectively participate in—social media

The Ebb and Flow Of Communities

Want A Corporate Social Media Job? Demonstrate These Three Essential Qualities

How To Spot Social Media Snake Oil

Join a Discussion on Ethics (and Even More Vital Topics) in Blogging

Dear Groundswell: Your business social netiquette questions

The Three Spheres of Web Strategy –Updated for 2009

Demographics of Facebook Growth

Smart Working – Building a Stellar Online Community

You can find all of my links on Delicious.

Transparency and Disclosure: Honda on Facebook

This week there was yet another example of someone within a company talking about his company’s products on Facebook while posing as a consumer instead of disclosing his relationship with the company. In summary, don’t do this. It’s slimy, people will find out, and it reflects poorly on both the person and the company.

Honda on Facebook

I’ve talked about transparency and disclosure before on this blog, so I won’t go into details. In short, if you have a business relationship with a company that you are mentioning on any social media site, disclose it.

Blogging Elsewhere

Here is this week’s summary of links to my posts appearing on other blogs:

Intel Software Network*

If you want a feed of all of my blog posts across multiple sites, you can also subscribe to my über feed.

*Disclaimers:

  • I provide consulting services to Intel, and these blog posts are one part of my consulting engagement.

Recent Links

Here are a few interesting things from this week that I wanted to share …

Master List (A Wiki of Social Media Monitoring Solutions)

What to do once your firm’s social media policy is written

The Biography Of WordPress – With Matt Mullenweg

The Latest Technology

Nineteen Free Twitter Tools that Turn Tweets into Knowledge

How Procter & Gamble Got Employees to Use Social Networking at Work

You can find all of my links on Delicious.